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Please remember to plan ahead and attend Mass this Wednesday for the Feast of the Assumption of Our Lady into Heaven! ... See MoreSee Less

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4 days ago

I think a relation of mine was ordained in your church,I have a 2 photo albums of Murphy's,Gilmans, and Flynns (my relations) full of pictures of Bostonians that is like to trace any help would be greatly appreciated. Most taken by the Gray photo company Tremont street MA ... See MoreSee Less

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2 weeks ago

Mary Immaculate of Lourdes Parish

August is dedicated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Sancta Maria, ora pro nobis! ... See MoreSee Less

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We share this photo of last Friday's full “blood” moon as it appeared over our Church and campanile, in a veil of clouds.

“O Virgin, fair as the moon,
delight of the angels and saints in heaven,
grant that we may become like you
and that our souls may receive a ray of your beauty,
which does not decline with the years
but shines forth into eternity.
O Mary, sun of heaven,
restore life where there is death
and enlighten spirits where there is darkness.
Turn your countenance to your children
and radiate on us your light and your fervor.”

(Excerpt from Mary Our Strength, a prayer of Pope Pius XII)
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2 weeks ago

Mary Immaculate of Lourdes Parish

We are so pleased to welcome back to our parish our former parishioner Fr. Jon Tveit, who is visiting us from his parish in New York. Fr. Tveit, who was a member of our parish choir prior to entering the seminary, was the celebrant of our 10:30 a.m. Mass yesterday. Deo gratias! ... See MoreSee Less

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Pastor's Note: "Jesus Loved Martha and Mary her Sister and Lazarus her Brother" --John 11:5

In the Church's sanctoral calendar the Feast of Saint Martha is celebrated a week after the Feast of St. Magdalene, thus creating an informal octave of the two sister saints (again: in the liturgical tradition of the western Latin Church the Mary of Bethany and Mary Magdalene are taken to be one and the same person.) The family appears in the Gospel of St. Luke and in the Gospel of St. John. In St. Luke, we have the account of one night of hospitality during which Our Lord drew a lesson in not allowing the cares of life to cloud our vision of the higher things of heaven. In St. John, we have the story of the Raising of Lazarus from the dead four days after he had died --the greatest of all Christ's miracles before His own Resurrection from the Dead.

The account in St. Luke's Gospel is found in Chapter 10, verses 38-42. It is the Gospel Lesson used for the Mass of St. Martha. Martha, as the elder sister, is the proper hostess of the home and she is busily engaged in all of the tasks involved in giving hospitality. Mary (Magdalene) her sister, however, is seated at the feet of the Lord, listening to His word. In frustration, Martha demands that Jesus tell Mary to help her. The Lord answers: "Martha, Martha, thou art anxious and upset about many things: but one thing is necessary. Mary hath chosen the best part which shall not be taken away from her."

As one commentary on this Gospel Lesson explains it:

"Jesus did not reproach Martha, but explained that even in the midst of the service which we offer Him, our first duty is to listen to Him, to contemplate Him. The active life of service to Christ in our neighbor, with all its anxiety and fatigue endured for His love is very meritorious; but as St. Bernard says, 'Happy the home where a Mary gives cause for Martha's complaints,' where the claims of external occupations are not allowed to take her away from a life of prayer. God wishes to be recognized for what He is, the source of all blessings. The contemplative life brings souls into direct contact with God, and so more effectively ensures their salvation, but it also certainly obtains the graces which make the active life fruitful." (Saint Andrew's Missal, 1952)

It should be noted that Mary was already very much accustomed to actively caring for the Lord in the way that Martha was doing in their family home on that particular occasion. St. Luke tells us at the beginning of Chapter 8 that there were several worthy women of means, who had experienced conversion and healing from Christ and "who ministered unto Him of their substance." That is to say, they took care to provide for Christ with the necessary food and drink and afforded Him hospitality. Mary Magdalene is the first named of these holy women. We may say then that she did her part in the "active" apostolate as well as her sister Martha (and actually, taken all together, probably more of it.) How praiseworthy indeed Mary Magdalene's capacity to (as one Mass-formulary prayer says), "judge wisely the things of earth and love the things of heaven."

Fr. Higgins
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3 weeks ago

Mary Immaculate of Lourdes Parish

Pastor's Note: The Lourdes Pilgrimage of the Mother of St. Thérèse of Lisieux

Between 18-22 June 1877, Zélie Martin, the mother of St. Thérèse of Lisieux, the "Little Flower", made a pilgrimage to Lourdes seeking a miraculous cure from the metastasizing breast cancer that was rapidly killing her. (Zélie and her husband Louis are themselves now canonized saints of the Church: they were canonized by Pope Francis in 2015. Their feast-day is July 12th, for the anniversary of their marriage. They were married in a church at midnight on the night of July 12th-13th, 1858.)

As strong Catholics the Martins were believers in the Apparitions of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Lourdes, which had received the approbation of the Church. Louis Martin had been part of the first national pilgrimage in 1873, for the spiritual regeneration of France, and again in 1875. Given her deteriorating condition Zélie Martin went in haste to Lourdes on the first organized pilgrimage she could find. She went without her husband, accompanied only by her three oldest daughters, Marie, Pauline, and Léonie.

She went with the conviction of faith that she would be miraculously healed, if God willed it for her through Mary. As she wrote to a letter to her sister-in-law: "I do not count on anything by the help of the Good Mother. If she wishes it, she can cure me, she has cured many other sick people."

The pilgrimage, however, filled with mishaps and personal misfortunes, did not result in a miraculous cure, Madame Martin died on August 28th, 1878, at the age of 46. Her youngest daughter Thérèse was only four years old.

It was a struggle for Zélie to come to terms with her impending death, but she accepted it, as we know now from her letters to family members at the time. Just before the pilgrimage to Lourdes she had confided to her brother how she was praying that if the Blessed Virgin would not obtain a cure for her, then that she would cure her daughter Léonie, who had what we would identify today as severe developmental problems. After the pilgrimage she was inspired to meditate deeply on the words of Our Lady to Bernadette, "I do not promise to make you happy in this life, but in the next," and their application to her in her situation.

And in a letter to her daughter Pauline the mother counseled against disappointment:

"I wish to know in what spiritual dispositions you find yourself and if you're still angry against the Blessed Virgin? Don't expect a lot of joys on this earth, you will have a great many disappointments. Courage and confidence ["courage et confiance"]. Pray with faith to the Mother of Mercies, she will come to your aid with the goodness and the sweetness of the most tender of Mothers."

Fr. Higgins
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3 weeks ago

Mary Immaculate of Lourdes Parish

Today we had the joy of celebrating a Solemn High Mass with three returning friends of the parish. The main celebrant was Fr. Désiré Salako, S.M.A., our deacon was parishioner Reverend Mister Brian O'Hanlon, who is currently in his last year of priestly formation at St. John's Seminary, and our subdeacon was parishioner Abbé Tyler Molisse, who is in priestly formation with the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest. We are blessed to welcome them all back this week and are thankful to them for celebrating this morning's 10:30 a.m. Mass. Deo Gratias!

Our gratitude extends, as well, to the Sisters of St. Augustine, who made the beautiful, green vestments worn today for the first time by our celebrants. Fr. Salako has gifted these vestments to our parish in thanksgiving for our support of his mission in Africa. May these vestments remind us each time they are used of the friendship of our sister parish and the need for our continued assistance to them.

(Photos courtesy of a parishioner)
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An unofficial website pertaining to Mary Immaculate of Lourdes Parish in Newton, MA. Parish bulletin archives, theological articles, and historical information.